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Rose maintains lead on Pickwick

From FLW Outdoors

22.Jul.2011 by Gary Mortenson

FLORENCE, Ala. – Known informally as the “ledge master,” Mark Rose of Marion, Ark., is certainly living up to that moniker this week – and then some. For the second straight day, Rose dominated the competition on Pickwick Lake with his ledge-fishing prowess, recording a two-day total of 42 pounds, 12 ounces to maintain the overall lead heading into Saturday’s third day of tournament action.

“You always want to be in the lead but I’d really like it to be a 10-pound lead at this point,” Rose said. “Tomorrow, I’m going to go out there and try to put some pressure on (second-place contender) ‘Boo’ Woods and some of the other guys. On this lake, no lead is really comfortable.”

While most of the top pros are fishing ledges, Rose has turned that technique into an art form, bringing in the largest stringer of the first day of competition – a monstrous 24-pound, 10-ounce sack – and the fourth largest stringer –18 pounds, 2 ounces – in today’s action.

“Yesterday was just a blessed day because those days don’t come along very often,” said Rose. “That 24-pound bag is the reason I still have a 4-pound lead in this tournament. But honestly, it hasn’t been easy. People think I just pull up on a spot and catch 15 pounds right away, but that’s not the case. It’s a real grind out there.”

Rose said that he’s hunting bass with a combination of Strike King Shakey Head worms and Strike King 6XD crankbaits.

“I’m basically going into one area early in the morning and trying to catch about 13 or 14 pounds with the Shakey Head and once I get that limit I’ll start moving around trying to cull up,” said Rose. “I’m (targeting) a big school of fish that are pretty deep and not very active. Today I spent a lot of time just sitting on a drop and using a small worm to try and finesse them out. I chose to stay there most of the day and grind it out. But it’s a timing thing. If I see a fish jump, I’ll pick up one of my moving baits.”

While Rose has dominated the competition so far, he said he’s hardly resting on his laurels as there are still many potential pitfalls awaiting anglers over the next two days of tourney action.

“With the shorter (tournament days), boat traffic, increasing amount of local anglers on the weekends and the (likely outcome of) no real current on Saturday and Sunday, you never know what’s going to happen,” said Rose. “Weights could definitely drop off over the next two days. I mean, I could come back with 8 to 10 pounds tomorrow, so you never know what’s going to happen.”

22.Jul.2011 by Gary Mortenson

FLORENCE, Ala. – Known informally as the “ledge master,” Mark Rose of Marion, Ark., is certainly living up to that moniker this week – and then some. For the second straight day, Rose dominated the competition on Pickwick Lake with his ledge-fishing prowess, recording a two-day total of 42 pounds, 12 ounces to maintain the overall lead heading into Saturday’s third day of tournament action.

“You always want to be in the lead but I’d really like it to be a 10-pound lead at this point,” Rose said. “Tomorrow, I’m going to go out there and try to put some pressure on (second-place contender) ‘Boo’ Woods and some of the other guys. On this lake, no lead is really comfortable.”

While most of the top pros are fishing ledges, Rose has turned that technique into an art form, bringing in the largest stringer of the first day of competition – a monstrous 24-pound, 10-ounce sack – and the fourth largest stringer –18 pounds, 2 ounces – in today’s action.

“Yesterday was just a blessed day because those days don’t come along very often,” said Rose. “That 24-pound bag is the reason I still have a 4-pound lead in this tournament. But honestly, it hasn’t been easy. People think I just pull up on a spot and catch 15 pounds right away, but that’s not the case. It’s a real grind out there.”

Rose said that he’s hunting bass with a combination of Strike King Shakey Head worms and Strike King 6XD crankbaits.

“I’m basically going into one area early in the morning and trying to catch about 13 or 14 pounds with the Shakey Head and once I get that limit I’ll start moving around trying to cull up,” said Rose. “I’m (targeting) a big school of fish that are pretty deep and not very active. Today I spent a lot of time just sitting on a drop and using a small worm to try and finesse them out. I chose to stay there most of the day and grind it out. But it’s a timing thing. If I see a fish jump, I’ll pick up one of my moving baits.”

While Rose has dominated the competition so far, he said he’s hardly resting on his laurels as there are still many potential pitfalls awaiting anglers over the next two days of tourney action.

“With the shorter (tournament days), boat traffic, increasing amount of local anglers on the weekends and the (likely outcome of) no real current on Saturday and Sunday, you never know what’s going to happen,” said Rose. “Weights could definitely drop off over the next two days. I mean, I could come back with 8 to 10 pounds tomorrow, so you never know what’s going to happen.”

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